How to Dry it Out and Up

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There’s got to be some anxiety out there about this going dry in January thing.  In our case, it’s called the Ready to be Thirsty Challenge.  All over the world, interested parties are prompting drinkers to forgo the parties – at least for this January.  Or, at least keep those parties dry and you can watch your friends get all tipsy and daft without you…

Maybe your office’s seasonal cheer is a gonzo freak-show like Office Christmas Party, I don’t know.  But maybe any and all of us deserve a break from the madness, following all the Yuletide gaiety.  And if so, here’s a few suggestions on how to do it right (according to Marie Claire – always take sobering advice from a fashion magazine):

A. Do the challenge with a friend – why go it alone?  Strength in numbers!

B. Focus on your hobbies and other interestsyou’ll have time to learn silk weaving, or learn about cosmic string theory.  Read a book, go snow-shoeing, try something new.

C. Get busy – keep involved in your passions, unless your passion is vodka

D. Treat yourselfsave your booze bucks and get your nails done.  Or buy a real screwdriver instead of a Screwdriver.

E. Stay away from your triggerslike, say, the bar/restaurant, or meals that typically would inspire beer or wine

F. Let people know you’re doing it – if you’re friends know you’re off the suds, they are less likely to tempt you!

G. Eat healthy, live healthy – If you’ve stopped sipping for January, you might fill the gap with all the chocolate you got for Christmas.  Instead, make the challenge part of a larger scheme to lose some weight, get active.  It could change your whole approach to winter…

Read the whole article here

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The Upside of Situational Sobriety

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When you look at the picture above – do you see a glass of water or a vodka on the rocks?  Very telling, kiddo!

Never one to shy away from skepticism, I thought I would do a little digging on the potential benefits of going Dry for a month.

After all – there must be a point to this walk through the dry desert in January, this Ready to be Thirsty challenge.  I ain’t doin’ it for the good of my health, right ??  Oh, wait….

Check out this article from Good to Know. You’ll see that the potential benefits of going dry for 31 days are numerous and huge:

  • reduced sugar intake
  • weight loss
  • improved sleep
  • increased clarity (or reduced ‘brain fog’)
  • better hydration
  • heightened sex drive
  • enhanced mood

All in all, there are 15 listed benefits.  So if it’s even half true, you’ve got seven-plus reasons to give this a try.   Thirsty is as thirsty does, folks – I’ll be liver-deep in benefits and invoking my sober spirit after Christmas, drinking tea and watching my spleen get leaner by the minute.

Join me on the journey and reap what you didn’t soak.

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A Dry White Season Reason

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Once again, not against my better judgement but actually using my better judgement, I will attempt to GO DRY this January.

Yep – January this year.  Like the Brits, doing their Dry January

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Or an amalgam of Canadian charities doing their Dry January

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Or a British Columbia charity, BeYouPromise.Org, hosting their Dry January:

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Seems like everyone is doing this sober thing in January.  Makes sense.  In December you’ll be doing some serious indulging.  You’ll be gorging yourself on butter tarts and beer, turkey and tequila, whiskey, wine and wasabi.   You’ll be engorged with the Holiday Spirit(s)!

And then you’ll be spending time whooping it up on New Year’s Eve, either at a party or parties, or strangely alone on your couch.  Any which way, you’ll have tied it on, soaked it up, drank it down, ate the roast beast and otherwise heard the Whos who-whoing down in Whoville.

And maybe, just maybe… you’ll need a break from the boxes and soxes, the drinking and slinking.  If you do pause from boozing, it’s weight you’ll be losing.  If you break from misbehaving, it’s money you’re saving.  And if you stop getting wetter, your sleeping’ll be better…

Don’t make me steal the sobriety alone.  Go Thirsty this January.

 

Shake Shake Shake your Chibuku

Above, you see a group of rugby players attempting to try an African-produced beer-type drink called Chibuku Shake Shake.  This is technically ‘beer’, but not as we know it.  It’s a thick milky, brown-ish alcoholic beverage from Africa, made from sorghum.

As you can see in the video, it is served in a milk carton.  Interestingly, it’s alcohol content is not constant – as it is first packaged, it starts with a very low concentration, and gradually increases over time (after you buy it, if you don’t drink it right away, it gets stronger).  But, after about a week on the shelf, you wouldn’t want to drink it anymore, as it goes bad.  In fact, seeing this video, you may not want to drink it at all, as it appears pretty bad to begin with!

I learned about Chibuku from the following map:

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This is from the BBC – a world map of the favorite or most commonly consumed alcohol drinks across the world.

Orange countries love beer.  Yellow colored countries prefer spirits (aka ‘hard liquor’), and red countries dig their wine.  But those green countries – they love ‘other beverages’ – which led me to discovering Chibuku and a variety of other interesting and obscure variants out there.

Follow this link to article and the BBC Booze Calculator.  This will let you plug in your own weekly consumption habits and compare to international drinkers and countries the world over.  Not sure how much Chibuku you’re chugging down, but maybe you want to check out how much beer Canadians actually consume…

 

Session Impression

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Recently I was reading another Blog about ‘session-ability‘.   This is a new-age marketing term (actually stolen from the past) used to describe the drinking or consumption characteristics of certain Craft beers.   The blog itself, if you’re a beer drinker, is very engaging.

Read it here.

Before I give my thoughts on what a ‘sessionable’ beer might really mean to us, let’s examine a few more beer marketing terms and notions.

Drinkable – if your beer is drinkable, I suppose that means that you can, you know, drink it.  Or drink lots of it, I guess.

Less-filling – if your beer is less filling, it would mean you may not be as bloated if you drink a whole bunch of it.  It still fills your bladder, however.

Cold-filtered – many beers are filtered to get out the crap and junk you wouldn’t want to drink, like impurities, bacteria or gunk.  Interesting how the industry is using their mandate to not poison us as a term to make their beer somehow more desirable. Here’s picture from Wikipedia showing some of the stuff filtered from beer, during the brewing process:

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Just like any other product, brewers use stories, imagery, feelings and brand identification to sell their products.  They want to convince you to be thirsty and to be loyal to their brand and to drink lots of their beer.

Sessionable !  A beer is sessionable if you can drink lots of it and it doesn’t distract too much from the activity you are doing or conversation you are having, concurrent to drinking.  And, it may have a slightly reduced alcohol-content from a regular strength beer, such that you can engage in a longer session – drinking lots and lots of beer.

Maybe it’s just me, but the last time I managed to limit myself to one or two beers, instead of a whole epic ‘session’, I enjoyed it a lot more.  In fact, I have a tendency to regret anything epic I do in regards to alcohol, and I presume this is a fairly common feeling.

Beer glass photo by Rob Nyugen, via Creative Commons. No changes.

Generational Sobriety

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Never one to fear a new trend here at Thirst, we are happy to examine the neo-choice, the pendulum swing of the world, as captured in the infotainment of mass media.

Shedding light into the generational darkness, we have an article from The Globe and Mail extolling the highlights of chosen sobriety. Teetotalism appears to be the new fashion, perhaps for a few select famous persons, and perhaps among the young of legal drinking age.  We have millennials, who instead of sloshing around in the gutters of a block party as the rest of us did, instead seem to want to highlight their Jack Lalanne-esque power-juicing, selfie-on-Machu Piccu, yoga-enhanced lives, in contrary action to us Gen-X’ers.  They’ve got better things to do.

And evidently if your existence runs contemporary to Douglas Coupland, you never met a frothy, triple-hopped, watermelon-infused brew you didn’t want to stay home to drink.  We love that stuff!  Bring on the Sawdust City and Lake of Bays, baby, we’re ready to sip the suds and lose our flexibility in middle age.

Yes, us Gen-X folk, significantly later than previous generations (whom we envy) and the later generations (whom we mildly despise), we – the wanton and wild lost boys of the fall of Saigonwe are finally coming into enough job security to generate the disposable income to facilitate the ordering of beer online from the LCBO and to have it delivered by a mailperson right to our front door.  Oh yes, the day so cometh.

That’s not a good thing from a health perspective, if you ask the public health nurse 😦

Meantime, the younger set has a different set of values and I’ll assume it’s partly motivated by the conscious self-reverence of youth in bloom, and the docu-culture that compounds it.  Social media has made private lives into public spectacle, and drunkenness isn’t as rave as it used to be.   That’s actually a good thing from a health perspective, if you ask the public health nurse 🙂

While it’s difficult to appreciate the guy standing in front of you at a concert who would rather video the whole thing on his phone than actually, you know, be there….if he’s choosing to be high on life than on Bud Light, then heck, more power to his Android.

Photo by Ginny, via Creative Commons. No changes. 

PONG !!

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No, not that Pong.  This Pong:

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Beer Pong.  You know, that game involving ping pong balls and Solo cups and lotsa heavy drinking.

And we can find beer pong ‘kits’ and other drinking paraphernalia at local grocery stores and big box (department) stores that sell beer as an extension of their grocery department.  Funnels or beer ‘bongs’.  Drinking games. Other fun stuff.  All to encourage mass consumption and intoxication.

People love it so much, they’ve built interactive, electronic beer pong tables, as covered by the CBC.

Maybe it’s just me, but it seems a tad irresponsible to be marketing Beer Pong and the tools of crazy drunkenness in the same place they sell toys, cheese and baby clothes.  We have children, many of whom that cannot discern between colorful things meant for amusement or more nefarious activities, that are going to get the wrong impression.